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UNODC launches a Trafficking in Persons Handbook for Judicial Officers in South Africa

Johannesburg, 11-13 April 2022 – UNODC in collaboration with the South African Judicial Education Institute convened a Judicial Training Against Trafficking in Persons (TiP) in Johannesburg, South Africa from the 11 to 13 April, which is part of UNODC priorities in the Southern Africa Development Community (SADC) Region in enhancing the capacity of Judicial Officers in the response to human trafficking using victim centred approaches under the joint UNODC-SADC Regional Programme (2013 -2023). The Regional Porgramme aims to support SADC member states to respond to the evolving threats and challenges related to crime, drugs and terrorism in all its manifestations.

The objectives of the training were to strengthen capacity of Judicial officers to effectively address trafficking in persons with a special emphasis on vulnerabilities of victims and the trauma they suffer; strengthen Judicial officers’ understanding of vulnerability and its role in presenting challenges to evidence and using tools that explain psychology and culture with special emphasis on child victims to resolve the evidential challenges and to build the capacity of judicial officers on Sentencing principles on anti-trafficking in persons. Lastly, the workshop also acted to launch the Trafficking in Persons Handbook for Judicial Officers in South Africa.

The training workshop was in line with UNODC Strategic Vision for Africa 2030, which aims to provide innovative ways to support Member States and stakeholders over the next 10 years to strengthen crime prevention, enhance the effectiveness of criminal justice systems, counter organized crime and corruption, promote balanced drug control and improve the rule of law.

In the Southern African Development Community (SADC), one unique trend that stands out in the region is that convictions on human trafficking remain low. However, UNODC has over the years convened Regional Judicial Trainings on Combating Trafficking in Persons for Judges and Magistrates to strengthen the adjudication of cases. As such, the convening of anti-human trafficking trainings for judicial officers remains a key intervention in the response to human trafficking.

During the official opening of the workshop, Mr. Vincent Spera, Consul general, US Embassy to Republic of South Africa said that “Human trafficking is such an important issue for us to work on together. It erodes the rule of law, the safety of communities, the security of borders, and the strength of economies and it transcends borders, so we need a global coalition to confront it”.

Mr. Vincent Spera, Consul general, US Embassy to Republic of South Africa

Meanwhile, Dr. Gomolemo Moshoeu, Chief Executive Officer, South African Judicial Education Institute (SAJEI), said that “Trafficking in Persons is a very complex and serious human rights issue. Some of the common features of TIP are coercion, deception, slavery or forced labour, etc.  TIP is linked to different crimes like corruption, money laundering, terrorism, and others. The focus is on the profit margin. Adjudication of TIP requires constant refining of skills hence we are here today”. She went on to say that “SAJEI is celebrating 10 years in operation. It comes to mind that 10 years ago I was requested to start the Institute with an empty office, desk and telephone. Today, the Institute has African and international footprint which we are proud”

Dr. Gomolemo Moshoeu, Chief Executive Officer, South African Judicial Education Institute (SAJEI)

The Judicial training was made possible thanks to technical and financial support of the US Government State Department to Combat Trafficking in Persons (JTIP) and the European Government under the framework of the Southern Africa Migration Management (SAMM) Project

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UNODC launches a Regional Trafficking in Persons Case Digest for the Southern Africa Development Region

Johannesburg, South Africa – 22 – 23 March 2022 – UNODC Regional Office for Southern Africa convened a three-day Seminar for Prosecutors from the SADC Region to share experiences on prosecuting cases of Trafficking in Persons.

Up to 3 prosecutors from each of the SADC countries participated, physically and virtually.

The main aim of the litigation seminar was to build a healthy body of jurisprudence on TIP in the region and, consequently, to increase the number convictions obtained in the region on trafficking in persons.

Second, the meeting also acted to launch the UNODC Regional Trafficking in Persons Case Digest, which is a compilation and in-depth analysis of over 80 groundbreaking cases across the SADC Region. The Digest was developed over the entire 2021 from contributions of experts from the entire region and globally. It has references to key issues in the Region including labour exploitation, (harmful) cultural practices, sexual exploitation, types of evidence, evidential issues and challenges among many other themes and sub-topics.

The need for a Trafficking in Persons Case Digest emanates from the complexity of trafficking cases. Not only do these cases require proof by means of a number of elements, but each element, in itself, can require a constellation of circumstances to prove it. Moreover, the covert nature of the crime and the vulnerabilities of its victims make for typical evidential difficulties which can lead to wholesale exonerations, if not well understood.  Thus, the Digest is expected to be of significant value to prosecutors and judicial officers in the region.

During the opening of the seminar, Hon. John Jeffery, Deputy Minister of Justice, observed the need for international cooperation noting that “Trafficking in Persons is a daunting crime to prosecute, as it is often a hidden crime that does not stop at the borders of a country”. He went on to say that “All SADC member states acknowledge that they are affected by Trafficking in Persons as source, transit and destination countries for victims of trafficking. This is demonstrated by the fact that most SADC member states are parties to the Palermo Protocol and are taking domestic measures to implement their international obligations in this regard and/or have specific legislation to prevent and combat Trafficking in Persons”

Mr. Ilias Chatzis., the Head of the UNODC Human Trafficking and Migrant Smuggling Section said that “one of the six change enablers of UNODC Strategic Vision for Africa 2030 is forging strong partnerships, hence it is in this pretext, that UNODC is convening the regional litigation seminar for prosecutors to strengthen bilateral and regional cooperation in combating trans-national organized crime”.

In the Southern African Development Community (SADC), one unique trend that stands out in the region is that convictions on human trafficking remain low. UNODC has over the years convened regional workshops on Combating Trafficking in Persons for Prosecutors, Judges and Magistrates in order to strengthen the prosecutions and adjudication of trafficking in persons cases. Furthermore, such workshops strengthen regional and cross regional collaboration on combating trans-national organized crime especially trafficking in persons and smuggling of migrants.

The workshop saw three days of robust discussions focusing on Trafficking in Persons cases where exploitation did not transpire; focusing on subtle means of control including family complicity; focusing on victim consent; focusing on weaknesses in victim behaviors and how courts address them as well as focusing on issues arising in regard to child trafficking were deliberated on and strategies to address such issues were elaborated on.

The prosecutors, whilst speaking on elements of different cases they have encountered, demonstrated the gravity of the crime that Trafficking in Persons is. The trauma and harm that the victims are put through. Above that, the dedication that the Criminal Justice Sector has, to combat Trafficking in Persons cases, based on the efforts they put in to ensure that the perpetrators are arrested and prosecuted, and victims rescued and rehabilitated.

The meeting was made possible thanks to technical and financial support of the US Government State Department to Combat Trafficking in Persons (JTIP) and the European Government under the framework of the Southern Africa Migration Management (SAMM) Project.

  Panel Discussion: Malawi, Eswatini, Seychelles & Zimbabwe

Virtual participation: UNODC technical expert

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UNODC Trains members of the Anti-Trafficking Inter-Ministerial Committee (ATIMC) of Zimbabwe on Combating Trafficking in Persons

Mutare, 8-11 November 2021 – UNODC, under the framework of the Southern Africa Migration Management (SAMM) project and in collaboration with the Ministry of Home Affairs and Cultural Heritage facilitated a four-day training workshop from the 8 – 11 November 2021 on combating Trafficking in Persons (TIP) for members of the Anti-Trafficking Inter-Ministerial Committee (ATIMC) of Zimbabwe. The training workshop was convened in line with the priorities of the joint UNODC-SADC Regional Programme (2013 -2023) and also in line with UNODC Strategic Vision for Africa 2030, which aims to provide innovative ways to support Member States and stakeholders over the next 10 years to strengthen crime prevention, enhance the effectiveness of criminal justice systems, counter organized crime and corruption, promote balanced drug control and improve the rule of law. Furthermore, UNODC is committed to gender mainstreaming and exercises a proactive gender perspective in the process of assessing the implications of any planned action for both women and men, hence, the workshop was designed in line with UNODC Gender Strategy.

The main objectives of the workshop were to build capacity of members of the Anti-Trafficking Inter-Ministerial Committee (ATIMC) on the identification and investigations of TIP cases; to build the capacity of members of the ATIMC on TIP victim interview techniques; to build the capacity of members of the ATIMC on the international legal framework of TIP (including distinguishing TIP and the smuggling of migrants and to strengthen the coordination mechanisms of the ATIMC in the response to Trafficking in Persons (TIP).  Human traffickers exploit domestic and foreign victims in Zimbabwe, and traffickers exploit victims from Zimbabwe abroad. Internal trafficking is prevalent and underreported. Traffickers exploit Zimbabwean adults and children in sex trafficking and forced labour, including in cattle herding, domestic service, and mining (gold and diamonds). More than 71 percent of child labour occurs in the agriculture (tobacco, sugarcane, and cotton), forestry, and fishing sectors, where children weed, spray, harvest, and pack goods. Zimbabwe is a transit country for Somalis, Ethiopians, Malawians, and Zambians end route to trafficking in South Africa. Zimbabwe is a destination for forced labour and sex trafficking. Traffickers’ subject Mozambican children to forced labour in street vending, including in Mbare.

Mozambican children who work on relatives’ farms in Zimbabwe are often undocumented and cannot enroll in school, which increases their vulnerability to traffickers (JTIP, 2021).

During the official opening of the workshop, the Permanent Secretary for Home Affairs and Cultural Heritage, Mr A.D.T. Nhepera said that “considering the dynamic nature of human trafficking and the technical expertise required to ensure that our strategies remain relevant, it is necessary to keep updating our knowledge and skills through such training workshops to allow us to execute our duties as expected”. He went on to say that “this training workshop is in line with the National Plan of Action which requires us to engage in capacity building through training workshops to equip all resource persons with the relevant knowledge and skills to fight human trafficking”.

Group discussion: Human Trafficking case analyses

Furthermore after the 4-day training workshop, the participants were able to describe indicators of human trafficking; distinguish human trafficking from smuggling of migrants; apply the correct techniques for interview victims of trafficking in persons and understand their roles and responsibilities in combating trafficking in persons in Zimbabwe.   The training workshop was attended by Police officers, Immigration officials, Social workers, Prosecutors and labour inspectors who are all members of the Anti-Trafficking Inter-Ministerial Committee (ATIMC).

The Southern Africa Migration Management (SAMM) Project, funded by the European Commission, is a four-year project to improve migration management in the Southern Africa and Indian Ocean region. The SAMM Project is implemented by the ILO in collaboration with the International Organization for Migration (IOM), the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) and the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR). The overall objective of this programme is to improve migration management in the Southern Africa and Indian Ocean region.

 

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IOM, supported by the EU, donates medical items to support the Department of Immigration and Citizenship’s COVID-19 response

 

Gaborone, Botswana 12 November 2021 — Since the first confirmed case of the COVID-19 pandemic in Botswana on 30 March 2020, the Government of Botswana has implemented targeted responses to curtail the spread of the virus and minimize the socio-economic effects of the pandemic.

As a way of complementing the ongoing efforts of the government, the International Organization for Migration (IOM), with funding from the European Union, is enhancing capacity through the provision of medical supplies containing personal protective equipment (PPE) to the Department of Immigration and Citizenship in support of Botswana’s national response to COVID-19, particularly at borders. The handover of these essential supplies will take place in Gaborone in the presence of government officials and partners.

The protective equipment includes 85,000 surgical masks, 650 face shields, 40,000 latex hand gloves, and 375 liters of hand sanitizer. The donation is part of IOM’s response and support within the framework of the Southern Africa Migration Management (SAMM) project in Botswana. It aims at strengthening the operational capacity of immigration officials at border crossing points to facilitate safe migration in the face of the pandemic.

“IOM expresses its delight to the Government of Botswana for the proactive action taken to break the chain of transmission of COVID-19 in the country. It is extremely grateful to the immigration officials and health professionals who have ensured that the country’s borders remain safe amidst the pandemic. We are proud to complement the Government of Botswana’s efforts and to support the Department of Immigration and Citizenship in their operational response. The donation of PPEs will help keep immigration officials safe while they perform their duties of ensuring safe and orderly Funded by the European Union
migration at the borders”, said Mr. Charles Kwenin, IOM Regional Director for Southern Africa.

“The European Union is a staunch supporter of multilateralism and a loyal partner to the United Nations, so I am particularly pleased that we were able to join hands today with the IOM, to support the Ministry’s border operations by providing PPEs. We have trust in multilateral action, and I know this approach has support also from the Government of Botswana”, said Silvia Bopp-Hamrouni, Deputy Ambassador of the European Union to Botswana and SADC.

The COVID-19 pandemic has undeniably affected many people’s livelihood worldwide, leading to an increasing number of persons opting to migrate in search of better opportunities, and Botswana is no exception. Therefore, IOM is scaling up its interventions in Botswana with the Department of Immigration and Citizenship, the Department of Health, and other stakeholders. The aim is to strengthen Health, Border and Mobility Management1 approaches including assistance to vulnerable and stranded migrants in the mixed migration flows2 to prevent disease outbreaks. IOM remains committed to helping the Government of Botswana address the operational needs of the immigration officials in the country.

The provision of the PPE supplies to respond to the COVID-19 pandemic is generously supported by the European Union within the framework of the SAMM project aimed at strengthening the management of migration in the Southern Africa region.

For more information, please contact Mr. Tunde Omoyeni, Regional Coordinator SAMM project at somoyeni@iom.int

1 https://www.iom.int/resources/health-border-and-mobility-management-hbmm
2 Mixed migration | Migration data portal

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6th Ministerial Migration Dialogue for Southern Africa (MIDSA) Maputo, Mozambique

Ministers and Senior Experts of the Southern African Development Community (SADC), with representatives of IOM, partners and donors. Maputo, Mozambique, 28 October 2021.

 

PRESS RELEASE

6th Ministerial Migration Dialogue for Southern Africa (MIDSA)
Maputo, Mozambique

Maputo, 28 October 2021 – The International Organization for Migration (IOM) Regional Office for Southern Africa,  the  Secretariat for the Migration Dialogue for Southern Africa (MIDSA), facilitated the sixth Ministerial meeting of the Migration Dialogue for Southern Africa (MIDSA), in Maputo, Mozambique, from 25 to 28 October 2021.

The four day meeting convened Migration Experts and Senior Officials of SADC Member States from ministries with migration related functions and responsibilities notably; Home Affairs, Foreign Affairs, Labour, Health,  , Human rights, Social Welfare/ Development, Youth and Gender and relevant partners including technical  experts  from UN sister Agencies such as; ILO UNHCR, UNODC among others, under the theme “Reviewing Approaches to Safe, Orderly, and Regular Migration in the Context of COVID-19 in the Southern Region”.

The impact of COVID-19 pandemic and the related preventive measures such as, border closures, lockdowns, suspension of international flights etc, heavily affected migrants in countries of origin, transit and destination. The COVID-19 pandemic has highlighted the unique challenges faced by governments and communities in managing public health threats along the migration continuum and the interlinkages between public health and managing safe migration, including at borders, especially at Points of Entry (PoEs) on an unprecedented scale.

The COVID-19 pandemic’s overall impact on human mobility globally cannot be understated – limiting all but the essential movement of persons and creating a triumvirate of crises – health, protection and protracted socioeconomic impacts. Between March 21 and December 29, 2020, the International Organization for Migration (IOM) Regional Office for Southern Africa recorded a total of 166,872 migrant returnees from countries within and outside the Southern Africa Region.

“Migration has always been with us, but with the impact of COVID-19 pandemic, we felt the need to deliberate with all the relevant ministries of the SADC Member States with mandates on migration, as well as with partners, including the Regional Economic Communities (RECs); to reflect on how we can collectively work on harmonized approaches to ensure safe, orderly, and regular migration, in the Southern African region, in accordance with the Global Compact of Migration (GMC)”, said Charles Allan Kwenin, IOM Regional Director for Southern Africa.

The discussions formulated recommendations on issues around human mobility, borders and managing public health threats in the region, protection needs of migrants, strengthening the approaches for the collection and use of migration data in Southern African region, and unpacking the Integrative and Mobility Agenda for Socio-Economic Recovery (Skills Mobility & Diaspora Engagement).

The Ministers adopted the key recommendations of the MIDSA as well as the Maputo Diaspora Declaration, thus requesting IOM in collaboration with relevant United Nations (UN) Agencies and partners, in coordination with the Southern African Development Community (SADC) member states and the Secretariat, to develop a regional programme and a regional diaspora policy to facilitate the engagement of the Diaspora and transnational communities as agents of development among SADC member states.

In its capacity as the current Chair of SADC, the Government of Malawi will host the next MIDSA meeting in 2022, at experts and  senior officials level.

For more information, please contact Mr. Wonesai Sithole, Regional Policy and Liaison Officer  wsithole@iom.int

 

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EWBoUZj33ag
Interview: Charles Allan Kwenin, IOM Regional Director for Southern Africa
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Changing the Narrative on Migration: Call for Participants

Are you a journalist or media professional working on refugee issues or have a desire to do so? With nearly 80 million forcibly displaced people worldwide, and rising anti-migrant rhetoric and hate speech, it is imperative to build capacity for reporting on refugee and migration issues ethically and accurately. We are pleased to send you this call for participants for the upcoming “Changing the Narrative” project. The training programme will bring together a group of 12 journalists and media professionals from across Africa, Europe, and the Middle East to develop skills and capacity for reporting on refugee issues.

The programme will help strengthen media coverage of migration and refugee issues through skills building, networking, sharing of experiences, and learning more from experts in this field. The training will take place online in January; on-site visits and other exposure activities may be planned depending on pandemic restrictions.

The deadline to apply is Monday, 15 November at 12:00 noon (CET, Geneva time). Please see http://www.wacceurope.org/projects/changing-the-narrative-on-migration/ and the call for participants for all details and conditions. Please contact project coordinator, Erin Green (erin.green@wacceurope.org) should you have any questions.

The Changing the Narrative training programme is a project of WACC regional associations in Europe, Middle East, and Africa. WACC is a non-governmental organisation that builds on communication rights to promote social justice.

To learn more about WACC, please visit waccglobal.org. See also http://www.wacceurope.org/projects/changing-the-narrative-on-migration/

UNHCR, the UN Refugee Agency: 70 years protecting people forced to flee.

 

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JUDICIAL TRAINING OF TRAINERS ON HUMAN TRAFFICKING

Kasane, 11-13 October 2021 – UNODC in collaboration with the Department of Defence, Justice and Security convened a Judicial Training of Trainers Against Trafficking in Persons (TiP) in Kasane, Botswana from the 11 to 13 July, which is part of UNODC priorities in the SADC Region in enhancing the capacity of criminal justice practitioners in the response to human trafficking using human and victim centred approaches under the joint UNODC-SADC Regional Programme (2013 -2023). The Regional Programme aims to support the SADC countries to respond to the evolving threats and challenges related to crime, drugs and terrorism in all its manifestations.

The objectives of the training were to strengthen capacity of Judicial officers to effectively address trafficking in persons with a special emphasis on vulnerabilities of victims and the trauma they suffer; strengthen Judicial officers’ understanding of vulnerability and its role in presenting challenges to evidence and using tools that explain psychology and culture with special emphasis on child victims to resolve the evidential challenges; build the capacity of judicial officers on Sentencing principles on anti-trafficking in persons and lastly to build judicial officers capacity on adult learning principles for effective judicial reasoning.

The training workshop was in line with UNODC Strategic Vision for Africa 2030, which aims to provide innovative ways to support Member States and stakeholders over the next 10 years to strengthen crime prevention, enhance the effectiveness of criminal justice systems, counter organized crime and corruption, promote balanced drug control and improve the rule of law. Furthermore, UNODC is committed to gender mainstreaming and exercises a proactive gender perspective in the process of assessing the implications of any planned action for both women and men, hence, the workshop was designed in line with UNODC Gender Strategy.

In the Southern African Development Community (SADC), one unique trend that stands out in the region is that convictions on human trafficking remain low. UNODC has over the years convened Regional Judicial Trainings on Combating Trafficking in Persons for Judges and Magistrates in order to strengthen the adjudication of trafficking in persons cases. The convening of training of trainers for criminal justice practitioners on anti-trafficking in persons remains a key intervention in the response to human trafficking in the region. Hence, such trainings enhance the institutionalization and sustainability of anti-trafficking in persons interventions in the region.

During the official opening of the workshop, Hon. Thomas Mmusi, Minister of Defence, Justice and Security said that “judicial education on emerging crimes like human trafficking is extremely important. Complex legislation which we continue to draft, and other legal issues in today’s world require continual education and training. In addition, increasing media scrutiny also require that our judicial decisions are appropriate, fair and palatable to the general public to whom we account. This Training of Trainers workshop on Combating Trafficking in Persons, is therefore, indicative of Botswana’s efforts to ensure that we have an accountable, highly educated, resourceful and competent judiciary”.

UNODC has over the years provided technical support to the Republic of Botswana on the domestication of the Trafficking in Persons Protocol. This support has involved the strengthening the collection and analysis of human trafficking data, supporting the harmonization and operationalization of the Trafficking in Persons Act, building the capacity of criminal justice practitioners on combating trafficking in persons and supporting awareness raising initiatives on combating trafficking in persons.

The outcomes of the workshop include the following: the trained judicial officers will convene workshops whether formal or informal with their colleagues within the next three months; more training on Psycho-social issues related to TIP on the handling of Children and Witnesses will be convened for judicial officers in Botswana as that was identified as a gap during the training; the Ministry of Defence, Justice and Security will collaborate with UNODC to develop human trafficking sentencing guidelines.

Group discussion: Human Trafficking case analyses

Furthermore, after the 3-day training of trainers, the participants were able to describe indicators of human trafficking; critical role of Judicial Officers in Human Trafficking cases and understanding the vulnerabilities including victims and witnesses; distinguish human trafficking from smuggling of migrants; discuss current global debates on the element of exploitation and the  issue of consent; describe and apply key sentencing considerations and describe and apply key principles relating to non-criminalization of trafficked persons. The training workshop was attended by Judges and Magistrates from across all Botswana’s districts; officials from the Ministry of Defence, Justice and Security, officials from, the International Association of Women Judges (IAWJ-Botswana Chapter) and UNODC officials.

This Training of Trainers was held under the Southern Africa Migration Management (SAMM) Project which is a model of ONE-UN approach collaborative effort between 4 UN development and humanitarian agencies: the ILO, the IOM, UNODC and UNHCR. The overall objective of this programme is to improve migration management in the Southern Africa and Indian Ocean region.

 

 

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Cash Transfers- Support for migrant domestic workers

 

The reality of the COVID-19 virus in the Southern Africa region remains very present. Pressing and multidimensional challenges that arose since the outbreak of the pandemic in the first quarter of 2020 continue to be felt by all groups of the population including migrant workers. Migrant domestic workers have been particularly vulnerable to the effects of the pandemic, as many do not have formal contracts or access to social security.

Consequently, the already more severe food insecurity among low-paid workers such as domestic workers worsened during national strict lockdowns for those who had temporarily or permanently lost their employment. In addition, migrant workers often have difficulties accessing government support programs. For example, Human Rights Watch noted in May 2020 that “The South African government’s Covid-19 aid programs, including food parcels, have overlooked refugees and asylum seekers”.[i] Similarly, Botswana media reported that “immigrants were initially excluded from the Botswana government’s food parcels”.[ii]

It is against this background that the International Labour Organization through the Southern Africa Migration Management Project (SAMM) funded by the European Commission launched an income relief activity to benefit migrant domestic workers. This initiative targeting migrant workers was started in Botswana and South Africa during state of emergency and severe lockdown restrictions in the course of 2020. In their calls for help, trade unions and migrant civil society organizations pointed at the serious threat to the survival of groups of migrants, including migrant domestic workers.

Accordingly, and in collaboration with the Botswana Domestic and Allied Workers Union, around four hundred (400) food parcels were distributed to migrant domestic workers in various parts of Botswana. The distribution took place in urban and rural areas in July and August 2020. Foreign nationals working as child minders, cleaners, gardeners and cooks received the relief in the form of food parcels. Many of the beneficiaries were Zimbabwean migrant women working as domestic workers.

In South Africa, more than 900 vulnerable migrant domestic workers living in Gauteng successfully received cash transfer to cover expenses relating to basic needs. These transfers were made available through Izwi Domestic Workers Alliance Project and the Disabled Disabled Migrants Rights Networking Organization. Most recipients used the cash to purchase food for members of their households including school-aged children. Female migrant domestic workers assisted through the ILO income relief grant represent the large majority of the beneficiaries, who included nationals from Lesotho, Malawi, Mozambique, Swaziland, Zambia and Zimbabwe.

More recently, assistance was provided to returning migrant domestic workers in Lesotho. Facemasks, sanitizers and food parcels are being distributed to around 180 migrant domestic workers in several districts of the country.

 

 

 

[i] HRW.2020.South Africa: End Bias in Covid-19 Food Aid. www.hrw.org/news/2020/05/20/south-africa-end-bias-covid-19-food-aid

[ii] VAONEWS. 2020.On the Edge of Starvation, Hundreds of Zimbabweans in Botswana Want to Go Home. www.voanews.com/covid-19-pandemic/edge-starvation-hundreds-zimbabweans-botswana-want-go-home

 

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PRESS RELEASE “Towards the strengthening of tripartite social dialogue on the governance of migration in the Comoros”

On July 26 and 27, 2021, a virtual workshop to strengthen tripartite social dialogue on migration governance was organized at the Retaj hotel in the Comoros by the SAMM Project. Funded by the European Commission, this 4-year project aims to improve migration management in the Southern Africa and Indian Ocean region. The SAMM Project is implemented by the International Labor Organization (ILO), the International Organization for Migration (IOM), the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) and the Office of the High Commissioner for United Nations for Refugees (UNHCR).

The opening ceremony saw the presence of the Minister of Youth, Employment, Training and Professional Integration, Sports, Arts and Culture, the Vice-President of the Mouvement des Entreprises Comorians (MODEC), the Secretary General of the Confederation of Comorian Workers (CTC), as well as the Director of the Antananarivo Office. The specialists of the ILO together with the other partner agencies also supported the tripartite constituents with their expertise, especially during the discussions on the key national issues identified.

During the two days, several themes were discussed including the situation of labor migration in the Union of the Comoros, labor migration statistics, workers’ rights, social protection. The participants engaged in discussions on the identification of the major challenges at the country level, recommendations on Labor and Mixed Migration were formulated at the end of these two days of Dialogue with the objective of developing a roadmap for the next actions so that social dialogue is effective in relation to this governance of migration

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